Black Identity Extremist: Is Black The New Terrorist?

Roger Goodell wrote an impassioned, yet misguided plea to NFL Chief Execs and Club Presidents to compel their players stand for the National Anthem.  In the letter, he claims he and the League cares for the players concerns and opinions….

*Needle-on-the-record scratch*

You know what?  F-(Bleeeeep!!!)-k all that.  I got a bigger fish to fry here.  LET’S GO!!!

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On August of this year, the Counterterrorism Division of the FBI published an Intelligence Assessment.  The 12-page report obtained by Foreign Policy has coined what is soon to be a new dog-whistle term for any Black person in America who speaks out against injustice:

Black Identity Extremist.

Maybe it’s just me, but we’re about thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis close to being labeled as “terrorists” for advocating on our own behalf.

The very first sentence reads: “The FBI assesses it is very likely Black Identity Extremist (BIE) perceptions of police brutality against African Americans spurred an increase in premeditated, retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement and will very likely serve as justification for such violence.”

Perceptions… of police… brutality….

Almost immediately, decades of documented police brutality and racial profiling are summarily dismissed as “perceptions.”  They’re labeled as such because, in the eyes of the law, these officers who were put on trial were exonerated.  Some of these officers avoided incarceration for shooting and killing unarmed Black people.  If a law enforcement official can confront a citizen, confirm they’re unarmed, gain their compliance, shoot and kill him/her, AND HAVE IT JUSTIFIED UNDER THE LAW WHILE THE WORLD WATCHES, it’s not a “perception,” it’s a REALITY.

It’s a reality that I, and people who look like me, have to be extraordinarily nonaggressive in order to possibly survive an encounter with an extraordinarily aggressive officer.  Don’t our tax dollars pay for training officers to keep their cool while on-duty?  Does that training include throwing out all that knowledge when encountering Blacks?

#ImAskinForMyPeople

The assessment labels groups that the government considers to be dangerous and more prone to act out violently against police.  You can read the report and find out who they are.  I’ll say this much: as of now, it’s only limited to a few small groups and are a clear minority in the overall movement of Black empowerment and social justice.  They don’t have a history of violence against the government, but they will be attacked as though they’ve been public enemy #1, through both media and politics.  I highly recommend and strongly suggest you research these organizations for yourself, and come to your own conclusions, before mainstream media and the government formulate it for you.

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The assessment goes on to list six incidences of retaliatory police attacks since the 2014 police shooting death of Michael Brown, a Black, unarmed eighteen-year-old brother, in Ferguson, Missouri.  This particular incident is seen as the catalyst for the six examples or retaliatory acts against police.

Again, the tunnel vision in this report is mind-boggling.  In my mind, it’s a clear attempt to isolate and fragment an otherwise clear and contiguous history of violence and profiling against Black people.  It’s as though everything and everyone lived in perfect harmony until this one minor incident occurred, and now everyone’s blowing it out of proportion.  Apparently, no one had enough patience to list at least six murders of Black men, women, and children at the hands of police.  Don’t worry, here’s at least 75 to get you started.

I strongly believe that laws are created to enforce cultural beliefs.  The laws created by the United States of America are no different.  They reinforce a culture of disdain and disrespect of Black people.  Any law that goes against the dominant culture gets slowly eroded over time.  You need look no further than the 2013 Supreme Court ruling regarding the Voting Rights Act of 1965 for a recent example.

This counterterrorism assessment is yet another document in a long line of documents written with the purpose of chiseling away at any semblance of Black empowerment.  America’s history has shown us, time and again, that it will go to great lengths to sabotage and disintegrate any movement that seeks to level the playing field for us.  Eventually, the list of the few organizations named will grow to include almost any organization, and people, who speak out publically.  Every act of violence against police by a Black person will be attributed to them in the court of dominant cultural public opinion.

That opinion will influence the politics.  The politics will influence the legislation.  The legislation will influence the injustice.  The injustice will influence the outrage.  The outrage will influence the acts of violence.  The acts of violence will influence public opinion….

Do you see where this is going?

I don’t endorse the killing of police.  But as a Black man in America, I understand the rage that we feel when we see our own people murdered by the officials who swear to serve and protect us from harm.  We’re told to entrust our lives to them, but too often they take our lives, and are summarily justified according to the law.

I’ve chosen to focus my negative energy into building us up economically, in order to increase positive, wealth-generating contact among ourselves, and to regain control of our interactions with, and detrimental dependency upon, everyone else to provide necessary services to us.

All of you soon-to-be-labeled BIEs should do the same.  I love you.

Oh, snap…I forgot to mention COINTELPRO

#BlessedBeTheGrind

 

 

My Response to Retired officer Chris Amos’ Open Letter to Colin Kaepernick

(Click here if you have not yet read Officer Chris Amos’s open letter to Colin Kaepernick.)

Officer Amos, your service is truly appreciated.  From what I gathered in your letter, you were involved in a police-action shooting.  You were shot and wounded, and you responded by returning fire.  Unfortunately, a man died.  You were put on paid administrative leave and rehab, and returned to duty.  I’m glad you pulled through.  For that, I am thankful.

Now, let’s get down to business.  Your open letter to Colin Kaepernick DISGUSTS me.

Kaepernick’s protest specifically calls out police brutality.  His protest brings attention to officers who shoot and kill people UNJUSTLY and get away with it.  If you believe your actions were justified, why would you believe that he’s protesting you?  I’ll tell you why.  It’s because he IS protesting you.  Your open letter, no matter how well-intentioned, is merely a written version of the response given for as long as America has existed: a response of deflection.

His protest, along with many patriotic Americans, doesn’t just call out the obviously corrupt officers.  He also points the finger at you and your fellow officers who say and do little to root them out.  You speak about all the good that the overwhelming majority of 800,000 officers do for us as though it should be enough to shut us up about the few that do bad.  You deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

What also disgusts me is how you “dig up” your friends who either died or commited suicide in the line of duty, in an attempt to shame him, and by extension all protesters, for showing and voicing their discontent.  Allow your fellow officers to rest in peace!  They died upholding the same laws of this country that you upheld.  Those laws, among other things, grant the right to protest.  You don’t get to pick and choose which rights you care to enforce.  Your personal feelings DO NOT MATTER.  Kaepernick could hate your guts, but if he’s within his rights to do so, you have no choice but to protect him.  Here also, you deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

To protest, by definition, is to express objection to someone or something.  There’s no acceptable or inoffensive way to engage in it.  Dismissing the REASON for a protest because you don’t like the METHOD is unacceptable.  Dismissing his protest because he’s rich and famous is unacceptable.  You don’t respond by relabeling the protest a larger problem than the one it seeks to address.  But you did just that, and in doing so, you again deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

You made it a clear point in your letter to let us know that an elderly black man assisted you in locating the criminals you were chasing.  His helping you and your partner DOES NOT JUSTIFY YOUR BELIEFS IN ANY WAY.  He was simply doing what all citizens of America are asked to do when crime happens: speak up.  If anything, he and Colin Kaepernick have more in common than you will ever have with either one of them.  Speaking up in a community where decades of mistrust demands that you don’t talk to police is a tough thing to do.  And apparently, so is speaking up about law enforcement not serving and protecting everyone equally.  In this regard, once again, you deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.  (I’ll spare you, in the interest of time, my opinion of the history of America trotting out individual black people that, knowingly or unknowingly, cosign its agenda of racially-motivated politics, economics, and education.)

At some point we, as a nation, have to stop deflecting.  In the same way we call on other nations to own up to their mistakes, we must also own up to our own.  There’s no shame in that.  The shame comes when we deflect attention away from issues we need to address.  It’s paramount to defending bad behavior.

Sincerely,

Devin Wilson