Black Identity Extremist: Is Black The New Terrorist?

Roger Goodell wrote an impassioned, yet misguided plea to NFL Chief Execs and Club Presidents to compel their players stand for the National Anthem.  In the letter, he claims he and the League cares for the players concerns and opinions….

*Needle-on-the-record scratch*

You know what?  F-(Bleeeeep!!!)-k all that.  I got a bigger fish to fry here.  LET’S GO!!!

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On August of this year, the Counterterrorism Division of the FBI published an Intelligence Assessment.  The 12-page report obtained by Foreign Policy has coined what is soon to be a new dog-whistle term for any Black person in America who speaks out against injustice:

Black Identity Extremist.

Maybe it’s just me, but we’re about thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis close to being labeled as “terrorists” for advocating on our own behalf.

The very first sentence reads: “The FBI assesses it is very likely Black Identity Extremist (BIE) perceptions of police brutality against African Americans spurred an increase in premeditated, retaliatory lethal violence against law enforcement and will very likely serve as justification for such violence.”

Perceptions… of police… brutality….

Almost immediately, decades of documented police brutality and racial profiling are summarily dismissed as “perceptions.”  They’re labeled as such because, in the eyes of the law, these officers who were put on trial were exonerated.  Some of these officers avoided incarceration for shooting and killing unarmed Black people.  If a law enforcement official can confront a citizen, confirm they’re unarmed, gain their compliance, shoot and kill him/her, AND HAVE IT JUSTIFIED UNDER THE LAW WHILE THE WORLD WATCHES, it’s not a “perception,” it’s a REALITY.

It’s a reality that I, and people who look like me, have to be extraordinarily nonaggressive in order to possibly survive an encounter with an extraordinarily aggressive officer.  Don’t our tax dollars pay for training officers to keep their cool while on-duty?  Does that training include throwing out all that knowledge when encountering Blacks?

#ImAskinForMyPeople

The assessment labels groups that the government considers to be dangerous and more prone to act out violently against police.  You can read the report and find out who they are.  I’ll say this much: as of now, it’s only limited to a few small groups and are a clear minority in the overall movement of Black empowerment and social justice.  They don’t have a history of violence against the government, but they will be attacked as though they’ve been public enemy #1, through both media and politics.  I highly recommend and strongly suggest you research these organizations for yourself, and come to your own conclusions, before mainstream media and the government formulate it for you.

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The assessment goes on to list six incidences of retaliatory police attacks since the 2014 police shooting death of Michael Brown, a Black, unarmed eighteen-year-old brother, in Ferguson, Missouri.  This particular incident is seen as the catalyst for the six examples or retaliatory acts against police.

Again, the tunnel vision in this report is mind-boggling.  In my mind, it’s a clear attempt to isolate and fragment an otherwise clear and contiguous history of violence and profiling against Black people.  It’s as though everything and everyone lived in perfect harmony until this one minor incident occurred, and now everyone’s blowing it out of proportion.  Apparently, no one had enough patience to list at least six murders of Black men, women, and children at the hands of police.  Don’t worry, here’s at least 75 to get you started.

I strongly believe that laws are created to enforce cultural beliefs.  The laws created by the United States of America are no different.  They reinforce a culture of disdain and disrespect of Black people.  Any law that goes against the dominant culture gets slowly eroded over time.  You need look no further than the 2013 Supreme Court ruling regarding the Voting Rights Act of 1965 for a recent example.

This counterterrorism assessment is yet another document in a long line of documents written with the purpose of chiseling away at any semblance of Black empowerment.  America’s history has shown us, time and again, that it will go to great lengths to sabotage and disintegrate any movement that seeks to level the playing field for us.  Eventually, the list of the few organizations named will grow to include almost any organization, and people, who speak out publically.  Every act of violence against police by a Black person will be attributed to them in the court of dominant cultural public opinion.

That opinion will influence the politics.  The politics will influence the legislation.  The legislation will influence the injustice.  The injustice will influence the outrage.  The outrage will influence the acts of violence.  The acts of violence will influence public opinion….

Do you see where this is going?

I don’t endorse the killing of police.  But as a Black man in America, I understand the rage that we feel when we see our own people murdered by the officials who swear to serve and protect us from harm.  We’re told to entrust our lives to them, but too often they take our lives, and are summarily justified according to the law.

I’ve chosen to focus my negative energy into building us up economically, in order to increase positive, wealth-generating contact among ourselves, and to regain control of our interactions with, and detrimental dependency upon, everyone else to provide necessary services to us.

All of you soon-to-be-labeled BIEs should do the same.  I love you.

Oh, snap…I forgot to mention COINTELPRO

#BlessedBeTheGrind

 

 

5 Threats to The Black Man In America Part 5: Politics

The Declaration of Independence was unanimously signed by the Second Continental Congress on July 4th, 1776.

On July 5th, 1776, you, Black Man in America, were still a slave.

On June 21st, 1788, New Hampshire became the 9th (and deciding) state to ratify the Constitution of the United States of America.

On June 22nd, 1788, you, Black Man in America, were still a slave.

The 13th Amendment to the US Constitution, ratified in 1865 following the Civil War, outlawed slavery for all people EXCEPT convicted felons.  Three years later, the 14th Amendment guaranteed citizenship to all people born or naturalized in the United States.  The 15th Amendment ratified in 1870 grants voting rights to all people without respect to race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

Of these three amendments, the 13th is the most important in terms of how America uses its laws to continue our oppression in other forms.  “Black Code” laws and variations of those laws legally upheld segregation and unequal treatment of Black people for decades.  It allowed for harsher prosecution of Black criminals, leading to disproportionately high conviction and incarceration rates, and providing over a century of data to support the “fact” that Blacks deserve the treatment they receive from law enforcement.

“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, EXCEPT AS A PUNISHMENT FOR CRIME WHEREOF THE PARTY SHALL HAVE BEEN DULY CONVICTED, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction…”

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(Picture source: http://solitarywatch.com/2011/07/28/gods-own-warden-inside-angola-prison/)

Keep in mind, from a federal standpoint, women still didn’t have the right to vote.  That didn’t come until the 19th Amendment, ratified in 1920.  So only our men could vote.

Long story short: The cost of your freedom was NEARLY ALL OF YOUR FREEDOM.

The Constitution is the “supreme law of the land,” and no piece of legislation is allowed to stand in opposition to it.  All the legislations, statues, and lesser documents, including the ones that restricted our freedoms, were in agreement with this constitution. America’s history has shown, unequivocally that THESE LAWS ONLY CHANGE WHEN WHITE AMERICA FEELS THREATENED ECONOMICALLY.

Had Black people not rebelled through violence and escape from plantations, causing untold millions of dollars in damages to property (including themselves, because they were considered property), we’d probably still be slaves today.  Had Black people not been so economically prosperous during the latter half of the Jim Crow Era, to the point of organizing and sustaining targeted economic actions against legalized segregation, we’d still be drinking out of “Colored Only” water fountains and giving up front seats on public buses.

The reason American politics is a threat to the Black Man in America is because we, as a group, believe that it will cure our economic woes.  “Voting for the right politician will help us get out of our rut.”  “The next election is the most important election.”  And on the day after Election Day, we’re thrown on the backburner, left to wonder in amazement at how we got nothing out of the deal.

Wash.  Rinse.  Dry.  Fold.  Store.  Use.  Repeat.

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A big deal was made within the Black community about voting during 2016 election cycle.  Two candidates, Democrat Hillary Clinton, and Republican Donald Trump, fought for the presidency soon to be vacated by Barack Obama.  Neither of the two candidates were good choices for Black people.

Donald Trump…well, we know his history.  He touted it as a source of pride throughout the election with impunity.  Hillary Clinton, on the other hand, was considered by many to be the more palatable choice.  As First Lady to former president Bill Clinton, she supported his 1994 Crime Bill, which drove already high rates of incarcerated Black people into the outer reaches of space.  She was also seen on video referring to gang members (read: Black people) as “superpredators” who needed to be brought to heel.

No remorse for her support of that crime bill or her own statements was shown until she needed our vote.  And Black folks FLOCKED to her as though she could do no wrong, the same we were fooled into thinking Bill Clinton was our first “black president” because he played the saxophone on “The Arsenio Show.”

“You have to vote!  Our ancestors died for your right to vote!”

You know what my ancestors DIDN’T DIE FOR?  Me to settle for mediocre and to just hope that someone will “be nice to us.”  Or to settle for “the lesser of two evils.”  I didn’t vote in this election for those reasons.

It’s one of the most important decisions I’ve ever made in my life.

Surely, progress has been made in the fight for social justice. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was the last major piece of federal legislation to make us, in theory, equal to the rest of America. In practice, however, America continues to do what it’s always done: find ways to skirt its own laws to keep the upper hand in its relationship with its Black citizens.

We have to stop looking to politics as our way up and out.  Given the history of how this country has treated us LEGALLY, I see no hope in relying SOLELY upon our vote.  In a nation where capital fuels politics, a broke person with the power to vote can only elect an official who’ll continue listening to the person with the money.

I love you.  #BlessedBeTheGrind

 

5 Threats to The Black Man In America Part 4: Wealth & Ownership

Dr. Claud Anderson, in his book, PowerNomics: The National Plan to Empower Black America, defines “wealth” in an exceptionally accurate manner.  He defines it as, “…the net value of a person, group, or community less their liabilities of debt at a given point in time.  It is stored value.”  This net value can express itself in many ways, such as cash reserves, natural resources, or businesses owned.  He goes on to define “income” as, “…the flow of dollars over a period of time.”  These definitions are critical when discussing the wealth and ownership in Black America.

His overall assessment of Black wealth in America: WE OWN ALMOST NOTHING.

Taking a tour of the community in my own Black community of Fort Wayne, Indiana makes this assertion glaringly obvious.  Hair and beauty supply stores owned by Whites and Asians.  Gas stations/“convenience” shops and Chicago-style fry joints owned by people of Middle Eastern descent.  Drug stores chain stores and low-cost chain stores owned by Whites.  Banks owned by Whites.  In a neighborhood where Black people are the majority, we own very few essential businesses.

We’re constantly relying on other people to run businesses and provide services to us when we should be providing them ourselves.  And because we don’t own those businesses, we have no say in who gets hired.  We’re at the mercy of anyone merciful enough to set up shop in our part of town.  And we have to damn near beg for those business owners to hire us.

Cut the BS and call it what it is: ECONOMIC ENSLAVEMENT.

Economic enslavement doesn’t depend on your income.  You can be the richest man on the face of the earth, but it means nothing if your source of that income is dependent upon someone else paying you to operate their business.  I should make one thing clear: I find nothing wrong with working for someone else.  Some of us are happy with just punching the clock and doing whatever task is asked of them, without the added pressure of keeping an entire enterprise afloat.  But don’t get it twisted for a MOMENT.  You are always at the mercy of someone else, and the thought of that should make you at least a little bit uncomfortable.

 



 

Take a minute to study this graph, created by the Pew Research Center, highlighting income disparity between races:

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In 2014, the average income for a Black household of three hovered around $43,300.  Hispanics averaged around the same.  I grossed $43,472 that year, so I was right in the middle of that range.  After factoring in Federal, State, and Local taxes, 401(k) payments, and insurance, I was left with around $500 a week.  Accounting for rent, utilities, food, phone, and gas to get to and from work took me down to $170 a week.

And these are all considered necessities.  I just HAD to have that flippin’ iPhone, smh…

Then came my debt obligations.  My student loans ran me $60 every week, and my credit card debt for 2 cards totaled $30 a week.

Grand total spending cash for the week: $80.  Once again, that number may be higher or lower for you, depending on your own financial obligations.

My next question to you, Black Man in America, is this: What are we doing with the money we have left?

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One of the lasting effects of our physical and economic enslavement is, in my opinion, our reliance upon material things to flaunt our status.  It isn’t just the people flashing stacks of cash, driving fancy cars with rims taller than toddlers, or buying every pair of Jordan shoes that hit the market.  This cuts across age, sex, religion, and any other means of categorizing Black people.  We take our income and wealth and spend it, not only on things that depreciate (lose value) over time, but with people and business having little vested interest in our community.

In short, we buy things that lose value, from people who don’t value us enough to spend their earnings in our community, all just to show each other that we’re valuable.

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The most impactful thing we can do with our money is keep it in our communities as long as possible to bring the kind of economic change we need.  That means shopping local and “buying Black” wherever and whenever possible.  And if you can’t get it local, get online and seek out someone who has it.  The goal is to grow business for people who have a mutual interest in seeing our communities thrive.

Some people will accuse you of being racist, saying that you’re excluding other races of people from participating in our economic resurgence.  That is as far from the truth as our sun is from the edge of the universe…plus a foot.  Don’t fall for that BS argument.

Anyone who offers up that defense of the way things are is no friend to you. That person does not care about your economic well-being. It’s that simple.

We live in a capitalist society.  In order to thrive in that society, you have to play the game.  The hallmark of capitalism is competition, and letting the “free market” decide what’s fair.  You can shop wherever you want.  For the most part, one can control how you spend your dollar.  And anyone that wants your dollar better offer a product or service worth purchasing.

You can buy and own a pair of shoes.  Pool your money, and you can buy and own a shoe store, and generate wealth selling shoes to everyone.  You’ll always depend on customers for income, but you’ll see a greater reward from your hard work, because it’s yours.

When you own something, you become invested in its future success.

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It’s very rare that someone invests in something hoping that it’ll fail.  When you’re invested in the success of something, you’ll do whatever it takes to make that success possible.  When you begin to own and control the economics in your own neighborhood, you can create the jobs needed to generate more business for yourself and others, and put more people on the path to financial freedom.  It’s a beautiful thing.

And, most importantly, it stops gentrification.  Don’t get me started on that shit, B.

So, start a business. Invest in the stock market. Find ways to make your money work for you and Black America. If we don’t, we’ll continue to be where we’ll always be: Dead last and begging for a pass.

I’ll leave you with Malcolm X’s explanation of economic Black Nationalism.  I love you…

#BlessedBeTheGrind

“So the economic philosophy of black nationalism means in every church, in every civic organization, in every fraternal order, it’s time now for our people to become conscious of the importance of controlling the economy of our community. If we own the stores, if we operate the businesses, if we try and establish some industry in our own community, then we’re developing to the position where we are creating employment for our own kind. Once you gain control of the economy of your own community, then you don’t have to picket and boycott and beg some cracker downtown for a job in his business.”                 – Malcolm X, “The Ballot Or The Bullet”

5 Threats to The Black Man In America Part 3: Education

My Response to Retired officer Chris Amos’ Open Letter to Colin Kaepernick

(Click here if you have not yet read Officer Chris Amos’s open letter to Colin Kaepernick.)

Officer Amos, your service is truly appreciated.  From what I gathered in your letter, you were involved in a police-action shooting.  You were shot and wounded, and you responded by returning fire.  Unfortunately, a man died.  You were put on paid administrative leave and rehab, and returned to duty.  I’m glad you pulled through.  For that, I am thankful.

Now, let’s get down to business.  Your open letter to Colin Kaepernick DISGUSTS me.

Kaepernick’s protest specifically calls out police brutality.  His protest brings attention to officers who shoot and kill people UNJUSTLY and get away with it.  If you believe your actions were justified, why would you believe that he’s protesting you?  I’ll tell you why.  It’s because he IS protesting you.  Your open letter, no matter how well-intentioned, is merely a written version of the response given for as long as America has existed: a response of deflection.

His protest, along with many patriotic Americans, doesn’t just call out the obviously corrupt officers.  He also points the finger at you and your fellow officers who say and do little to root them out.  You speak about all the good that the overwhelming majority of 800,000 officers do for us as though it should be enough to shut us up about the few that do bad.  You deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

What also disgusts me is how you “dig up” your friends who either died or commited suicide in the line of duty, in an attempt to shame him, and by extension all protesters, for showing and voicing their discontent.  Allow your fellow officers to rest in peace!  They died upholding the same laws of this country that you upheld.  Those laws, among other things, grant the right to protest.  You don’t get to pick and choose which rights you care to enforce.  Your personal feelings DO NOT MATTER.  Kaepernick could hate your guts, but if he’s within his rights to do so, you have no choice but to protect him.  Here also, you deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

To protest, by definition, is to express objection to someone or something.  There’s no acceptable or inoffensive way to engage in it.  Dismissing the REASON for a protest because you don’t like the METHOD is unacceptable.  Dismissing his protest because he’s rich and famous is unacceptable.  You don’t respond by relabeling the protest a larger problem than the one it seeks to address.  But you did just that, and in doing so, you again deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.

You made it a clear point in your letter to let us know that an elderly black man assisted you in locating the criminals you were chasing.  His helping you and your partner DOES NOT JUSTIFY YOUR BELIEFS IN ANY WAY.  He was simply doing what all citizens of America are asked to do when crime happens: speak up.  If anything, he and Colin Kaepernick have more in common than you will ever have with either one of them.  Speaking up in a community where decades of mistrust demands that you don’t talk to police is a tough thing to do.  And apparently, so is speaking up about law enforcement not serving and protecting everyone equally.  In this regard, once again, you deflect attention away from the real issue: POLICE BRUTALITY.  (I’ll spare you, in the interest of time, my opinion of the history of America trotting out individual black people that, knowingly or unknowingly, cosign its agenda of racially-motivated politics, economics, and education.)

At some point we, as a nation, have to stop deflecting.  In the same way we call on other nations to own up to their mistakes, we must also own up to our own.  There’s no shame in that.  The shame comes when we deflect attention away from issues we need to address.  It’s paramount to defending bad behavior.

Sincerely,

Devin Wilson